The Cybertruck has storage avaulble in the 6’x4’ bed, front trunk,  roof, and in a hidden Gear Locker.  -  Photo: Tesla

The Cybertruck has storage avaulble in the 6’x4’ bed, front trunk,  roof, and in a hidden Gear Locker.

Photo: Tesla

With 11,000 lbs. of towing capacity, and a 340-mile range, is the new Cybertruck from Tesla a good fit for work truck fleets?

Tesla’s website states you can “haul everything you need with 2,500 pounds payload and 11,000 pounds towing capacity — the equivalent of an average African elephant. The super-tough composite bed doesn’t need a liner and is big enough for 4'x8’ construction materials.”

Although it is being advertised as a truck that can be used for work or personal use, there are two reasons you might not want to add it to your fleet.

Cybertruck’s Price Compared to Competitors

Tesla announced a handful of customers will take delivery of Cybertrucks from their headquarters in Austin, Texas.

An updated price was also announced. The truck rose from $39,000 to:

  • $60,990 for Real-Wheel Drive.
  • $79,9900 for All-Wheel Drive.
  • $99,990 for Cyberbeast.

Most work truck fleets would need the all-wheel drive model with has a range of 340 miles, 11,000 lbs. towing capacity, 600 horsepower, and 7,435 lb.-ft torque.

For fleets looking to save costs in the future, the all-wheel drive model might be out of their price range. Especially when the competition is priced at:

  • Chevrolet Silverado EV, $77,905
  • Ford F-150 Lightning, $49,995
  • Rivian R1T $73,000.
The Cybertruck has a maximum payload of 2,500 pounds and 67 cubic feet of lockable storage.  -  Photo: Tesla

The Cybertruck has a maximum payload of 2,500 pounds and 67 cubic feet of lockable storage.

Photo: Tesla

A Closer Look at Safety Risks and Practicality for Fleet Operations

The Cybertruck maybe suitable for towing and looks pretty with its dent-resistant exoskeleton, but for other types of fleets, it may be useless.

For fleets that have technician drivers, they need room for tools and easy access to those tools. And the truck’s design might even be a safety concern for fleet managers.

As Chris Brown, associate publisher of Automotive Fleet said in an article, “It’s got so many sharp angles you might get impaled. The truck’s profile forms a near-perfect 120-degree angle peak from the front grille to the rear tailgate.”

So far, there is no word on upfitting packages from Tesla. But it does state that “The super-tough composite bed doesn’t need a liner and is big enough for 4'x8’ construction materials.”

Tesla also stated that the truck is set to enter production in 2023 and a quarter million Cybertrucks a year are expected to be produced. But they won’t reach that output until 2025.

Let us know your thoughts on the truck in the comments!

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Our team of enterprising editors brings years of experience covering the fleet industry. We offer a deep understanding of trends and the ever-evolving landscapes we cover in fleet, trucking, and transportation.  

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