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Safety & Accident

Video Safety Tip: Understanding Traction Control

December 11, 2017

VIDEO: How Traction Control Works

A vehicle’s traction control system uses the anti-lock braking components to restrict wheel spin when accelerating on slippery surfaces.

This feature, which engages only when the wheels start to slip, helps make driving smoother and also helps drivers maintain control on icy or wet roads.

Traction control is especially beneficial when a driver accelerates from a stopped or slowed position or tries to climb a slippery hill. But according to the National Safety Council, there are two situations when traction control should be turned off: when a vehicle is stuck in deep snow or mud and you need to rock the vehicle back and forth to get free, or when the vehicle’s tires have snow chains installed on them.

To view a National Safety Council video and learn more about traction control, click on the photo or link below the headline.

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