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Safety & Accident

Calculating Commercial Vehicle Weight Distribution & Payload Made Easy

Axle capacities are limited either by the axle capacity or the legal weight limits, whichever is lower. Performing a weight distribution analysis can achieve the proper axle loadings before a truck is built.

September 2011, Work Truck - Feature

by Richard Toner

Performing a weight distribution analysis can prevent building trucks that are overloaded in normal use, causing problems for users and the equipment installer.  Overloads can shorten the live of a vehicle and its components. Overloads can also prevent compliance with weight laws and federal safety standards.

In the examples above, having the correct wheelbase on the chassis and placing the bodies and loads in the proper place will assure that the axles are located correctly. Performing a weight distribution analysis will tell you that you can achieve the proper axle loadings before building the truck.
In the examples above, having the correct wheelbase on the chassis and placing the bodies and loads in the proper place will assure that the axles are located correctly. Performing a weight distribution analysis will tell you that you can achieve the proper axle loadings before building the truck.

What & Why of Weight Distribution

Weight distribution is the amount of the total vehicle weight imposed on the ground at an axle, group of axles, or an individual wheel. The weight on a truck must be distributed on the axles to comply with the chassis manufacturer's axle ratings and weight laws.

Having the correct wheelbase on the chassis and placing bodies and loads in the proper place will ensure that axles are loaded correctly. Performing a weight distribution analysis identifies the proper axle loadings before building a truck.

Axle capacities are limited either by the axle capacity or legal weight limits, whichever is lower. Both trucks in Image A have a front axle rated at 12,000 lbs., limiting the weight on those axles. The rear axle on the single-drive truck is limited by the axle capacity or legal weight restrictions to 20,000 lbs. The two rear axles on the tandem-drive truck are limited either by axle capacities or legal weight restrictions to 17,000 lbs. for each axle, or a total of 34,000 lbs. for the pair of axles.

Center of Gravity

The center of gravity of an object does not have to be in the material of the object (Image C). When considering a solid ball, such as a billiard ball, it is obvious the center of gravity is the center of the ball and in the material that makes up the object. In the case of a hollow ball, the center of gravity is also at the center, but it is not in the material. If the center of gravity of a truck body is in the material of the body, it is coincidence. Most of the time, the center of gravity of a truck body is in the air, similar to the hollow ball example.


Each component on a truck, including the passenger and cargo, has a center-of-gravity (CG). The centers-of-gravity of the truck chassis is shown at the top of the frame rail at the cab and body and cargo centers-of-gravity are shown with a single symbol at the center of the body about a third of the body height above the floor.
Each component on a truck, including the passenger and cargo, has a center-of-gravity (CG). The centers-of-gravity of the truck chassis is shown at the top of the frame rail at the cab and body and cargo centers-of-gravity are shown with a single symbol at the center of the body about a third of the body height above the floor.

Each truck component, including passengers and cargo, have a center of gravity. For example, the center of gravity of the truck chassis is shown at the top of the frame rail at the back of the cab and the body and cargo centers of gravity are shown with a single symbol at the center of the body about a third of the body height above the floor.
The horizontal and vertical centers of gravity for the entire sample truck is shown with the center of gravity (CG) symbol. Horizontal CGs are measured from the front axle, which is the zero point. Toward the rear is positive and toward the front is negative. The horizontal CG is shown with the red line and the red arrow.
The horizontal and vertical centers of gravity for the entire sample truck is shown with the center of gravity (CG) symbol. Horizontal CGs are measured from the front axle, which is the zero point. Toward the rear is positive and toward the front is negative. The horizontal CG is shown with the red line and the red arrow.

For the process of calculating weight distribution on the axles, the horizontal centers of gravity are used. If individual wheel loadings are calculated, the lateral centers of gravity are also used. Unless a lateral center of gravity is given for the chassis or a component, it is assumed to be on the centerline of the chassis.

Lateral centers of gravity (CGs) are measured from the vehicle centerline toward the right or passenger side as positive, left as negative (Image E). These are used to calculate individual wheel loadings and incompliance calculations.

Lateral CGs measured from the vehicle centerline with toward the right or passenger side as positive. Toward the left is negative. They are used to calculate individual wheel loadings and inccompliance calculations.
Lateral CGs measured from the vehicle centerline with toward the right or passenger side as positive. Toward the left is negative. They are used to calculate individual wheel loadings and inccompliance calculations.


"Moments" are a force or weight times a distance. One pound of force times one foot is 1 ft.-lb. One pound of force times 12 inches is 12 in.-lbs. They are both the same moment. Moments can be used to calculate CGs, weight distribution, frame loads, hoist capacities, and effective wheelbase.

Moments provide a way to combine a number of components or items to calculate a CG for them as a group (Image F). When the CG distance is known for all items combined, it is possible to calculate the weight on each axle. Moments in one direction must match the moments in the other. The down moment of the chassis plus the down moment of the body must equal the up moment on the rear axle.

Comments

  1. 1. robert colon [ February 15, 2014 @ 09:07AM ]

    assuming a 20 foot w.base, an 8k# single rear axle dual wheel E rated, is there a rule of thumb for the effective center assuming a symmetric load , such as. a 9k# water tank. And should it be rear biased. proportional to the moment. of an emergency deceleration condition. A rule of thumb from effective center , to the 'moment' a constant proportionally calculated and rated to1/2 the height of the load (again the load is liquid)

  2. 2. robert colon [ February 15, 2014 @ 09:08AM ]

    assuming a 20 foot w.base, an 8k# single rear axle dual wheel E rated, is there a rule of thumb for the effective center assuming a symmetric load , such as. a 9k# water tank. And should it be rear biased. proportional to the moment. of an emergency deceleration condition. A rule of thumb from effective center , to the 'moment' a constant proportionally calculated and rated to1/2 the height of the load (again the load is liquid)

 

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