Don't fear making mistakes, it's all part of the learning process. - Photo: JESHOOTS.com from Pexels

Don't fear making mistakes, it's all part of the learning process.

Photo: JESHOOTS.com from Pexels

The way fleet was run yesterday is not how fleet will be run tomorrow. As fast as equipment and regulations change, fleet managers are working harder than ever to stay on top. 

There have always been issues with more than two sides — gasoline or diesel? Leasing or owning? In-house or outsourced maintenance? 

The savvy fleet manager today is realizing there are more than two sides for most of these stories and that often not one solution is going to work for every fleet — or even every vehicle in one fleet. 

In an era of budget crunches and continually doing more with less, the idea of making a mistake can be cringeworthy. But Albert Einstein once said, “A person who never makes a mistake never learns anything new.” 

If we are too afraid to try new things because of the fear of failure or making mistakes, we run the risk of stagnation. 

Taking calculated risks and trying new programs, services, or ways of operating is essential to growth as one of today’s fleet managers. 

“A person who never makes a  mistake never learns anything new.”

– Albert Einstein

Become ‘Possibility Thinkers’

In the world of fleet, we all need to be “possibility thinkers” and imagine the “what if” scenarios. From the good to the ugly, it can only help to prepare us for anything. 

  • What if gasoline prices reached $8 per gallon? What would you do?
  • What if you could use a more layered approach to using data? How would you use it?

What are your “what if” questions? How are you striving to become a “possibility thinker?”

Recover Quickly

We have all had those rough days, where nothing seems to go right, everything is a fire that should have been handled yesterday, and now you have to go and talk with your drivers, senior management, or a vendor. You feel burned out and defeated and know it’s going to come through to your listeners. Perhaps that new idea you tried out didn’t work right. 

How can you go out there with a higher level of confidence? There are quite a few actions you can take immediately to help quickly rebuild your confidence and get you prepared to get out there and deal with the world. Here are a few of my favorites:

  • Breathe. First and foremost — take a moment and take 10 slow, deep breaths. Collect yourself and your thoughts before going out to deal with another crisis or situation. Taking a moment between problems can help reduce the chances that your feelings about one situation will overflow into the next. 
  • Smile. Did you know you can “fake yourself happy”? According to the Harvard Business Review, a little smile can help to increase the feelings of happiness and make you feel more at ease and ready to take on the world. 
  • Strike a pose. Some people, including a few on-air broadcasters and journalists, swear by “striking a pose.” Before they have to go on camera or deal with a tough interview, they find a private space, spread their feet, put their hands on their hips, and hold their chin up high. This helps create a feeling of strength to take on the world. 

New Options & Changes on the Horizon

In February, we dig into some of the new mobile services that have been popping up, from maintenance to fueling and the benefits these programs have for a variety of fleets. There is also a new generation of millennial fleet drivers, which will continue to impact fleet as we know it today. Fuel management is also changing every day. We dig into truck batteries — from selection to maintenance. We also take a look at how OEM parts & service programs are changing with the industry.

Trying new ideas can be scary, and it can be tempting to continue with the way things are done. After all, if it isn’t broke, why fix it? The top reason: because something doesn’t have to be broken to not work its best. 

What are you trying out? What did you try that didn’t work but taught you something? 

E-mail me, let’s chat! 
lauren.fletcher@bobit.com

Author

Lauren Fletcher
Lauren Fletcher

Executive Editor

Lauren Fletcher has covered the truck fleet industry since 2006 and is the executive editor of Work Truck magazine.

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Lauren Fletcher has covered the truck fleet industry since 2006 and is the executive editor of Work Truck magazine.

View Bio
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