The Number 1 Resource for Vocational Truck Fleets

Hybrids – Vehicles, Battery & Hydraulic Technology

Workhorse Hybrids Benefit from Drone Usage Ruling

June 24, 2016

Workhorse has been testing its HorseFly UAS delivery drone system for the past six months, which is launched from the roof of the E-Gen electric delivery truck. (PHOTO: Workhorse)
Workhorse has been testing its HorseFly UAS delivery drone system for the past six months, which is launched from the roof of the E-Gen electric delivery truck. (PHOTO: Workhorse)

Workhorse Group Inc.’s fleet of EPA-approved E-Gen hybrid trucks has benefited from a new Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ruling that approves the routine commercial use of drones.

Workhorse has been testing its HorseFly UAS delivery drone system for the past six months, which is launched from the roof of the E-Gen electric delivery truck, according to the company. The rules allow drone operators that weigh less than 55 pounds to fly without permission from the FAA.

"The FAA's new rules represent a welcomed first step in the modernization of commercial drone flights in the United States. We believe Workhorse is uniquely placed within the commercial package delivery sector to take advantage of this rule,” said Steve Burns, CEO of Workhorse. “Unlike other companies that are likely to adapt off-the-shelf drone technology for package delivery, Workhorse has been alone in conceiving a truck-and-drone delivery model literally from the ground up.”

Workhorse Group recently began offering its E-Gen hybrid delivery trucks with BMW's i3 range-extender solution to produce more on-board electricity that will extend the range of the delivery vehicle.

Comment On This Story

Name:  
Email:  
Comment: (Maximum 10000 characters)  
Leave this field empty:
* Please note that every comment is moderated.

FleetFAQ

Fleet Tracking And Telematics

Todd Ewing from Fleetmatics will answer your questions and challenges

View All

 

Fleet Management And Leasing

Merchants Experts will answer your questions and challenges

View All

 

Sponsored by

A subcompact car is defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as having a total cubic volume (for cargo and passengers) of between 85 and 99 cubic feet.

Read more